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Saturday, May 20, 2017

Bouillabaisse

                                               An array of fish & seafood are used
      
I’m heading in a few days to a fishing village located on the Mediterranean in France, and I'm already already dreaming of Bouillabaisse.  This classical French fish stew is synonymous with dining on the French Riviera.  There’s hardly a restaurant on the water in Marseille or St Tropez that doesn’t offer this complex dish.  Those who don’t have it are typically simple eating places that can’t afford the costly seafood, fish and saffron---not to mention the long, slow cooking process to make the Mediterranean’s most flavor-filled fish dish.

Many think that Bouillabaisse originated in Marseille but research shows otherwise.  This quintessential French fish chowder actually has its roots in the Greek civilization.  It was Greeks living on the western coast of Turkey who founded Marseille in 600 BC.  These ancient Greek sailors brought with them a recipe for a fish soup that is similar to France’s Bouillabaisse.

The fish stew of the original Greek settlers became very popular in the early days of Marseille.  As Marseille was growing into a powerful port city, the fishing industry became its biggest economy.  The fish that the fishermen couldn’t sell was brought home for wives to add to the family’s fish soup.  Most of the fish that didn’t sell were those with bones so Bouillabaisse morphed into a rich stew because of the flavors added by these bones, fish heads, and other unsightly fish parts that could not be sold.
                                                                                              
Another change in the dish occurred when the tomato was brought back from the Americas in the 16th century.  They were soon added to the broth for flavor, color and acidity.  In the 19th century Marseille had become very prosperous.  Bouillabaisse, once a poor fisherman’s dish, was reinvented with the addition of pricey saffron, and began appearing in upscale restaurants.    

I will be preparing Julia Child's version soon at a “Week in Provence with Julia Child.” To get in the mood I'm watching Julia's French Chef TV show:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZuiTwik0vvU 

Bon Appetit!




Saturday, May 13, 2017

The Birthing of a Provençal Rosé

                                    Rosés in Provence are made in 2 distinct methods
I’m leaving shortly for Provence.  At this time of year Provence is synonymous with Rosé.  For centuries, Rosé has been a staple in southern France’s district of Provence.  Today, however, Provence is the world’s leading district for dry Rosé production (accounting for nearly 50% of the region’s wines).  While there are three different ways in which a Rosé can be made in some regions of France, in Provence there are only two methods for creating a Rosé.
Let’s start with the basics.  Vinifying a Rosé starts with red wine grapes.   Clear juices from the grapes are kept in contact for a short time with the darkly pigmented skins.  Once the juice becomes pinkish (or a deeper salmon or coral) from contact with the dark skins, it is then removed from further interaction with the skins. 
Now, let’s discuss Provence’s two ways of birthing a Rosé.  The first method is called “saignée,” a French term which means “to bleed.”  The saignée method literally “bleeds” or siphons off some of the grape juice during the making of a red wine fermentation.  (The remaining red wine, now quite concentrated, is then fermented separately from the Rosé).  Among many current Rosé purists, saignée is viewed as merely a by-product of a more complex red wine.   Nonetheless, this method remains popular in many parts of the world and the resulting Rosés can be superb. 
The second method in Provence involves a direct pressing of the grapes, with the sole purpose of making a Rosé.  Soon after the red grapes are harvested they are pressed, separating the juice from the skins.  Because the contact with the juice and skins is minimal, these “pressed” Rosés tend to be paler than those of saignée. This technique is especially popular now in Provence and continues to grow in popularity with winemakers around the world.  Many winemakers prefer the direct press method as they are able to have the final product (Rosé) in mind from the picking of the grapes through vinification (in contrast to saignée where red wines are the final product). This means grapes can be harvested at the optimal period for a Rosé versus a Grenache or Syrah.
Here’s a list of my favorite Rosés from Provence in alpha order:
  • Chateau Bormettes Instinct Parcellaire
  • Famile Negrel Petite Reine
  • Domaine Lafran-Veyrolles
  • Domaine Ribotte Cuvee Anais
  • Chateau Salettes 
  • Chateau Valentines Huit

  Have a Rosé-colored Sunday!


Sunday, May 7, 2017

Rothschild Bubbly

                                                        Rose, Blanc de Blanc & Brut

Champagne made by the Rothschild family?  To those who know French wine this is an oxymoron.   After all, the Rothschild family is from Bordeaux and they only produce the area's Premier Cru red still wine.  By French law, even if the company produced sparkling wine in Bordeaux it could not be called Champagne as only bubbly made in the demarcated area of Champagne in northeast district of France can be called Champagne.  But, the Rothschilds do produce Champagne….read on.

Champagne Barons de Rothschild is made up of three different branches of the family which individually own three different crème de la crème chateaux in Bordeaux: Mouton-Rothschild, Lafite-Rothschild and Clarke.   In 2003 these three branches of the family (often seen as rivals) came together and formed a boutique company with the sole purpose of producing Champagne.  All of the grapes that make their bubbly are from the Champagne region’s top vineyards.

The Barons de Rothschild Champagne was first released in 2015.  I had the good fortune to have one of these early bottles thanks to dear friends who graciously gifted me a bottle for my birthday.  I have never forgotten it and, in fact, blogged about it as one of the best wines I had in 2015.   Last week we had a party to christen a small property on the beach we just purchased.  These same friends showed up with another bottle of Rothschild Champagne.    


There are only 500,000 bottles made each year so it’s not widely available in the US.  However, it is worth seeking out.  You can find it easily online, and upscale area Costco’s occasionally have it.   I’ve had some serious Champagne in my day, but believe me when I say, this is gorgeous stuff.  The wine comes in five different possibilities.  There’s a Brut (made from Chardonnay and Pinot Noir), a Rosé (only Pinot Noir), a Blanc de Blanc (only  Chardonnay), and a 2005 Vintage wine (made only of grapes from this vintage).  I was gifted the Brut.

If you’re looking for a great bottle for a special occasion, look no further.  This wine is the bomb.